INSIDE UNC: College Tips and Information

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Preparing for the Return to Campus

As August 21 quickly approaches and you prepare to begin or return to the college experience here at UNC, you may be feeling excited, nervous and possibly even a little anxious. Here are some tips that might help.

  • Explore your new environment. Walk/drive/bike around so you become familiar with the way to class, food, recreation, and the nearest store. The more familiar you are the less foreign your new environment will feel. 
  • Bring memories along. It’s ok to bring with you the comforts of home. Decorate your room with familiar pictures, your favorite pillows, posters, etc. to help it feel more like home.
  • Talk to your roommate prior to your arrival on campus. Meet for coffee, text or chat over Facebook. Then you won’t be meeting them for the first time on move-in day. This will also give you a chance to discuss who is bringing what so that you don’t end-up with unnecessary duplicate items!
  • Get connected by introducing yourself to 3 new people every day. Having familiar faces can help you feel less lonely in your new environment.

As a parent, it is important to:

  • Express understanding: Remember to be sympathetic towards your student and to normalize their experience. Sharing your own experiences of times when you were homesick or dealt with a similar situation can make all the difference in helping your student feel that they are not alone.
  • Encourage self-care and positive coping: Often times when students are stressed or homesick, they can forget to engage in basic self –care such as eating right, exercising and getting proper sleep. You may want to encourage your student to focus on developing healthy habits in these areas and taking time for activities they enjoy.
  • Encourage Involvement: Here at UNC, there are many activities and clubs that students can get connected with in order to start building a sense of community and forming new relationships and interests. Student Activities in the University Center can be a great resource to explore opportunities to get involved. While your student may be resistant to this idea, it is important to try and encourage them to get involves in all the college experience has to offer. 
  • Stay positive: It can be difficult to receive a call from your child who is struggling to adjust to all the changes that college life brings. While it is helpful to reassure them that you miss them, try to stay positive in your conversations and let them know that feeling homesick is a normal part of the college transition for many students, and that the feelings are likely to ease up over time.
  • Plan visits home, but not too often: Remember, the key to overcoming homesickness is to find ways to connect with others. If your student is not spending time on campus on the weekends, it makes it more challenging for them to make those connections and participate in activities. Going home every weekend or calling home dozens of times per day may serve to prolong homesickness.
  • Recognize when homesickness becomes something greater: If after several weeks you notice that your student’s negative feelings don’t subside, share your concerns with them and encourage them to seek the help of a professional. The UNC Counseling Center in Cassidy Hall offers free individual and group counseling session to UNC students. In addition, there is the Psychological Services Clinic in McKee Hall that offers low-cost services to UNC students and people in the Greeley community. You can reach the Counseling Center at 970-351-2496 or the Psychological Services Clinic at 970-351-1645.
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Learning Higher Education Lingo

Higher Education has many terms that may be unfamiliar to students and parents. Here are a few terms that might help as you navigate the college experience. 

Academic Advisor – A faculty or staff member who assists students with clarification of academic, life, and career goals and helps the student the development of educational plans to achieve those goals. Advisors can help students choose a major, register for classes, and ensure proper courses are chosen in order to complete a degree. Assigned Advisors can be found on URSA (see below) in the student tab under General Student Record.

Add/Drop Deadline – The last day where students can add a class or drop a class without any penalties. The UNC 2014 Fall Semester Add deadline for full-semester courses is August 29th and the Drop deadline for full-semester courses is September 8th.

Bursar – the Bursar’s Office is responsible for the billing and collection of student charges and loans. The Bursar’s Office is located in Carter Hall 1002.

FAFSAFree Application for Federal Student Aid. A form that can be prepared annually by current and prospective college students in the US to determine their eligibility for student financial aid. 

FERPAFamily Educational Rights & Privacy Act is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. FERPA applies to the education records of persons who are or have been in attendance in postsecondary institutions.

Pre-Req or pre-requisites – Course that a student must pass before taking an advanced course.

Registrar – The Office of the Registrar maintains students’ personal and academic records. The Office is located in Carter Hall 3002.

Syllabus – The outline and summary of topics to be covered in a course. Students are encouraged to thoroughly review each course syllabi for important dates, faculty contact information, etc.

Work Study – Part-time employment to students who work on campus for University employers or off campus in certain community service positions. Federal and state work-study are forms of financial aid awarded to students demonstrating financial need and meet certain requirements. Work study allocations are the total dollar amount that a student may earn during the academic year. Work-study and student hourly jobs are posted on our website. Students are paid according to the number of hours worked. Questions regarding work-study should be directed to the UNC Financial Aid Office.

URSAUniversity Resource for Systems Access. UNC’s online point of access to secure information and tools, used by students to manage their registration, view their grades, view and pay their student bills, receive notifications and messages about their financial aid, complete student forms and more. 

For more terms and definitions, visit the UNC College Road Map for Families Guide.

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Student Veterans of America at UNC

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As I work with veterans and military students here at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC), I often get compliments on what we are doing for our students. Occasionally, I get complaints, comments, and suggestions for improvement. Some ideas are stellar.. others not so much. Many times…

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Pack Smart: Checklist for a Freshman
We are just about 5 weeks away from hall opening for the 2014-15 academic year. For many of you this is your first major move.  We know that it can be a tough decision on what to bring and what to leave at home. Your new home-away-from-home at UNC might be smaller than your room at home, so it is important to make a checklist and get organized.  
Another important tip is to reach out to your roommate to find out what they plan on bringing for the room. Maximize your space by not duplicating large items like printers, microwaves, mini-fridge, etc. 
When packing, utilize containers that you can use for storage; plastic milk crates, under-bed boxes, laundry baskets and more.  
Here are some helpful checklists: 
Tools & Supplies:

Batteries
Light bulbs
Duct tape
Flashlight
Sewing kit
Basic toolkit
Tape
Emergency kit (band-aids, Neosporin, cotton balls, etc)
Powerstrip
Ziplock bags
Plastic food containers

 Personal Items: 

Towels (wash, hand, bath)
Shower flip-flops
Shower caddy/basket
Hair care products
Styling tools
Hair dryer
Trash bags/trash can
Laundry basket/detergent
Pillows
2 sets of sheets
Lamp
Small fan
Cosmetics
Toothbrush/toothpaste/floss
Shaving items
Reusable water bottles
Flu and cold medicines          

Study Needs:

Laptop/laptop lock
Calculator
Memory stick
White out
Pens/pencils
Printer
Printer paper
Headphones
Alarm clock
Post-its
Stapler/staples

Clothing:  The important thing to remember here is to bring items that are going to be comfortable, easy to care for, and provide you with the opportunity to mix and match. In Colorado we can have sun and snow in the same day so bring a variety. We like to say that you need to layer in Colorado.  Don’t try to pack everything you own. You can make trips home where you can change things out or send some things home and have a “clothing care package” sent to you with a fresh selection. 

Bring a few dressier items for special occasions
Comfortable shoes (athletic, dress, outdoor)
Jackets for various weather conditions 

For a complete list on what to is approved and what is not approved visit the Housing & Residential Education website. Please share any packing tips that you have below!

Pack Smart: Checklist for a Freshman

We are just about 5 weeks away from hall opening for the 2014-15 academic year. For many of you this is your first major move.  We know that it can be a tough decision on what to bring and what to leave at home. Your new home-away-from-home at UNC might be smaller than your room at home, so it is important to make a checklist and get organized.  

Another important tip is to reach out to your roommate to find out what they plan on bringing for the room. Maximize your space by not duplicating large items like printers, microwaves, mini-fridge, etc. 

When packing, utilize containers that you can use for storage; plastic milk crates, under-bed boxes, laundry baskets and more.  

Here are some helpful checklists: 

Tools & Supplies:

  • Batteries
  • Light bulbs
  • Duct tape
  • Flashlight
  • Sewing kit
  • Basic toolkit
  • Tape
  • Emergency kit (band-aids, Neosporin, cotton balls, etc)
  • Powerstrip
  • Ziplock bags
  • Plastic food containers

 Personal Items

  • Towels (wash, hand, bath)
  • Shower flip-flops
  • Shower caddy/basket
  • Hair care products
  • Styling tools
  • Hair dryer
  • Trash bags/trash can
  • Laundry basket/detergent
  • Pillows
  • 2 sets of sheets
  • Lamp
  • Small fan
  • Cosmetics
  • Toothbrush/toothpaste/floss
  • Shaving items
  • Reusable water bottles
  • Flu and cold medicines          

Study Needs:

  • Laptop/laptop lock
  • Calculator
  • Memory stick
  • White out
  • Pens/pencils
  • Printer
  • Printer paper
  • Headphones
  • Alarm clock
  • Post-its
  • Stapler/staples

Clothing:  The important thing to remember here is to bring items that are going to be comfortable, easy to care for, and provide you with the opportunity to mix and match. In Colorado we can have sun and snow in the same day so bring a variety. We like to say that you need to layer in Colorado.  Don’t try to pack everything you own. You can make trips home where you can change things out or send some things home and have a “clothing care package” sent to you with a fresh selection. 

  • Bring a few dressier items for special occasions
  • Comfortable shoes (athletic, dress, outdoor)
  • Jackets for various weather conditions 

For a complete list on what to is approved and what is not approved visit the Housing & Residential Education website. Please share any packing tips that you have below!

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The Breakdown on Federal Loans

There are many ways to pay for college, but if you need to take out a loan, take the step and apply for a federal loan.

Federal loans consist of the Direct Subsidized or Unsubsidized Stafford loans but in order to apply for them, you must fill out a Federal Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA application is free and available until June 30 the following year.

If you’re confused about what the loan types mean, here’s a great article from Federal Student Aid that breaks it all down for you. This is a must read for anyone considering taking out student loans!

For further assistance regarding student loans, please feel free to speak with a financial aid counselor by email at ofa@unco.edu; or call us at 970-351-2502 or visit with a walk-in counselor form 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at Carter Hall 1005.

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As you are thinking about applying for student loans, you may some questions like what federal loans are available or what are the differences between federal and private student loans? Check out this great article at Student Aid that might help!

If you still have more questions on loans or financial aid, please contact our Office of Financial Aid or call us at 970-351-2502. We are happy to help!

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Chef Spotlight: Dan Senn
We would like to introduce Dan Senn, our Unit Chef at Tobey-Kendel Dining Room. 
After completing a three year culinary apprenticeship in his home country, Switzerland, Dan moved to the United States in 1981 and then eventually to Colorado in 2001. With 35+ years of experience in the culinary field, he is still excited to learn about new food trends and cuisines from around the globe. He even loves cooking in his free time, and he likes sharing some of his favorites. Here is one of his crepe recipes.

Ingredients:

1 cup flour1 tablespoon sugar1/4 teaspoon salt1 1/2 cups milk4 large eggs3 tablespoons butter, melted

Instructions:

1. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar and salt. Make a well in the center and add the eggs, butter, and milk.2. Use a whisk to completely blend all ingredients until smooth.3. Heat a lightly oiled 12-inch skillet over medium heat.4. Add a 1/3 cup batter to completely coat the bottom of the skillet. Cook for about 2 minutes or until the underside is lightly golden. Use a spatula to loosen the edges, and use your fingertips to flip the crepe over to the other side.5. Cook for another minute and slide the crepe off the pan. Repeat until all ingredients are used up and re-oil pan as needed as you go. Makes about 10 crepes.

Crepes are great served with butter and syrup, or top them with fresh fruit and cream!
You can see Chef Dan at Tobey-Kendel Dining Hall where he is busy trying out new recipes for our students. You can always check out our online weekly menus to see what is he and his team have created.

Chef Spotlight: Dan Senn

We would like to introduce Dan Senn, our Unit Chef at Tobey-Kendel Dining Room. 

After completing a three year culinary apprenticeship in his home country, Switzerland, Dan moved to the United States in 1981 and then eventually to Colorado in 2001. With 35+ years of experience in the culinary field, he is still excited to learn about new food trends and cuisines from around the globe. He even loves cooking in his free time, and he likes sharing some of his favorites. Here is one of his crepe recipes.

Ingredients:

1 cup flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups milk
4 large eggs
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Instructions:

1. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar and salt. Make a well in the center and add the eggs, butter, and milk.
2. Use a whisk to completely blend all ingredients until smooth.
3. Heat a lightly oiled 12-inch skillet over medium heat.
4. Add a 1/3 cup batter to completely coat the bottom of the skillet. Cook for about 2 minutes or until the underside is lightly golden. Use a spatula to loosen the edges, and use your fingertips to flip the crepe over to the other side.
5. Cook for another minute and slide the crepe off the pan. Repeat until all ingredients are used up and re-oil pan as needed as you go. Makes about 10 crepes.

Crepes are great served with butter and syrup, or top them with fresh fruit and cream!

You can see Chef Dan at Tobey-Kendel Dining Hall where he is busy trying out new recipes for our students. You can always check out our online weekly menus to see what is he and his team have created.

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The “D” Word is Not Fun

Default.

Your furnace broke, your car needs new tires or you drop your cell phone and crack the screen… These are all legitimate reasons to wonder if you can pull the funds from Peter to pay Paul.

But before you take the funds from your student loan payment to pay for unexpected expenses, contact your loan lender to see if there is something they can do to help you before you go into default on them.

There are flexible repayment options that are provided by the lender; you just have to make the call before too much time has passed on your payment.

Going into default because you stopped making a payment for more than 270 days is no fun for you or your lender. Possible consequences include: your credit score reflects this negatively, your paycheck or federal tax refund can be garnished or set to a collection agency, and/or you could find it hard to make up the payments in the long run.

If you find yourself in default, there are options for you to consider:

  • Ask for a deferment or forbearance: This allows you to temporarily postpone your payments or reduce the loan payment overall. There are certain criteria that need to be met in order to qualify for them. Contact your lender for more information. 
  • Consolidate your loan payments into one: Multiple loans can be a hassle as to what and when a payment is taken out, the interest on them and the life of the loans. Having one loan payment taken out with less interest is the best way to go.
  • See what other repayment options are available: This option may be your best fit. Maybe what you chose in a repayment option a year ago is not working for you today. By contacting the lender to see what else is available to you can potentially lower your interest or your payments in general.

For more information about default, click here to read a Federal Student Aid article. To discuss how to manage your loans, contact your loan servicer.

If you’d like to speak with a financial aid counselor please call us at 970-351-2502, email us or stop by Carter Hall 1005 between 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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Flavored Waters at Tobey-Kendel Dining Room

If you’ve been in a convenience store lately, you may have noticed the amount of beverage options available. The space dedicated to beverages is no longer a single cold case in the back of the store, but it can now take up two or three walls. Sodas, juices and energy drinks fill the coolers. The newcomer is flavored water.

In a recent trip to a local convenience store, Executive Chef Aran Essig counted… there were 21 different varieties of water and flavored water. Some were purely flavored, while others contained just as much sugar as a can of soda. There are many flavor, infusion and vitamin enhancements to choose from. Be sure to read the labels though if you are choosing this option as a healthy substitute to soda. You may be surprised to see the sodium and sugar content of some of the water options out there.

Our bodies need constant replacement of water supply to function properly. The average adult human body consists of 50-65% water. Without it we feel the symptoms of dehydration such as tiredness throughout the day, slow reactions, inability to concentrate… and eventually numerous health problems due to poor circulation and regulation throughout the body’s systems.

Many of us grew up knowing that the general rule of thumb is to drink about eight (8 ounce) glasses of water per day. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website recommends a total daily beverage intake of 13 cups for men and 9 cups for women – and remember that this includes beverages other than water. If you’re curious, about 20% of our water needs are obtained through the foods we eat. Some foods, like lettuce, watermelon, broccoli, grapefruit, carrots and apples have a higher water content than others. 

Tobey-Kendel Dining Room has a flavored water station located along the south wall, just beyond the Wok ‘n Roll and Pizzeria stations. You will find a variety of flavored waters every day during lunch and dinner. There are no added sugars or other enhancements. We start with good old-fashioned cold water and add vegetables, fruits, and herbs to give this water a refreshing kick. Some of our favorite flavors so far have been Cantaloupe Mint, Honeydew Pineapple, Lemon Cucumber, Rosemary Orange and Watermelon Grapefruit. Come give our flavored waters a try and rehydrate your body and mind!

Students… you could do this very thing in your residence hall! Take a container (water bottles and mason jars work too) and put cut up fruit in the bottom. Fill it with water and let it sit in the refrigerator for a day before drinking. You’re saving money and getting your water for the day… in a creative and yummy way! Here are a few more flavors you should try: 

  • Strawberry, Lemon, and Basil
  • Strawberry and Orange
  • Strawberry, Mint, and Lemon
  • Strawberry and Lime
  • Strawberry and Cantaloupe
  • Orange and Lime
  • Orange and Blueberry
  • Lemon and Blueberry
  • Citrus and Cucumber
  • Cucumber and Mint
  • Lime, Cucumber, and Mint
  • Watermelon and Mint
  • Watermelon and Coconut
  • Rosemary and Grapefruit
  • Raspberry, Rose Petals, and Vanilla
  • Kiwi and Cucumber
  • Honeydew and Raspberry
  • Tangerine, Cucumber, and Strawberry
  • Pear, Cranberry, and Clementine
  • Peach and Mint
  • Pineapple and Mint
  • Pineapple, Grapefruit, and Apple

Water flavors change every day, so be sure to check them out and see what the newest combinations are. 

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