INSIDE UNC: College Tips and Information

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Have you heard of Alumni College? 
Alumni and friends are invited to join us for a day of classes without quizzes in an open and engaging environment. Through interactive presentations given by UNC faculty, attendees will gain insight into unique programs that put us on the leading edge in various educational fields. There’s something for every age and intellectual interest! For more information and to register, click here.

Have you heard of Alumni College

Alumni and friends are invited to join us for a day of classes without quizzes in an open and engaging environment. Through interactive presentations given by UNC faculty, attendees will gain insight into unique programs that put us on the leading edge in various educational fields. There’s something for every age and intellectual interest! For more information and to register, click here.

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Why is a Faculty Member Living in my Residence Hall?

Ever notice a faculty member living in your residence hall and wonder what that is all about? Well, here is your answer! We know that interacting with your faculty can be intimidating when you come to college. We also know that one of the keys to your success is going to be those very relationships. Who better to connect with about your passions and academic interest than someone who has committed their research and study to that very same subject? Who better to help you out in that 100 level class you are struggling in than the person teaching it?

The truth is, our faculty here at UNC are committed to your success and to building positive academic relationships with their students. They are SO committed in fact, that some of them have chosen to live in the residence halls to show you all it’s not so difficult to meet and interact with a faculty member. They are charged with the responsibility of programming and interacting with students in a less formal and hopefully less intimidating way. So take advantage of this opportunity to connect with some of our esteemed faculty members. They are eager to meet you and show you that faculty can be pretty cool too!

Learn who the Faculty in Residence is in your hall!

Go out and get engaged in your residence halls! If you need some direction, talk to your RA. We want you to love where you live and so do your faculty!

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UNC Dietetics Students Partner with the National Onion Association, Located Here in Greeley!

Last week UNC’s Dining Services and UNC’s Dietetics program partnered with the National Onion Association (NOA) to test various ways of caramelizing onions.

Prior to this lab project, the Dietetic students were asked to research the chemical process of caramelization and come with a knowledge of what would be happening in the process of conversion of sugars. Not only did they learn about onions, the caramelization process and product sensory evaluation, but they also analyzed the various methods of caramelization for actual sugar levels.

From the sensory evaluation results and the testing of sugar levels, the NOA will be able to determine the best method of caramelization, and results will possibly be used in marketing and education efforts. Kim Reddin (from the NOA) also presented to the class and shared information on the growing and harvesting cycle of onions, health research and other education topics that NOA is currently working on.

The National Onion Association is located right here in Downtown Greeley so it is a great partnership between departments, UNC and the local community.

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Edamame (eh-duh-MAH-may) is becoming more and more common every day. This green vegetable, commonly known as a soybean, is harvested at the peak of ripening. They are sweet in flavor, yet they taste crisp and fresh. Edamame is often eaten as a snack, a vegetable dish, or used in soups or other dishes where its sweet flavor and ripe texture can enhance the dish. The edible part of the plant is the seed which is encased in an inedible pod. To remove these sweet tasting beans, you lightly squeeze the pod open and the beans will pop out.

Edamame is very nutritious and is one of the few vegetables known to contain all the essential amino acids and Omega 3. It contains calcium, which not only builds strong bones and teeth, but also helps prevent heart disease and colon cancer. A serving of edamame contains 130 mg of calcium, nearly as much as 1/2 a cup of milk.

Other nutritional information for a serving of edamame:

  • Iron = 22% of a man’s recommended dietary allowance, and 15% of a woman’s. Carries oxygen throughout the body so the brain and muscles work optimally, preventing fatigue.
  • Potassium = 485 mg. Makes for a regular heartbeat and normalizes blood pressure.
  • Folate = 25% of the adult recommended dietary allowance. Folate is a B-vitamin that helps fight heart disease and prevent certain birth defects.
  • Magnesium = 62 mg
  • Phosphorus = 170 mg
  • Vitamin C = 27 mg
  • Edamame also contains Niacin, Beta Carotene, Folic Acid, B1, B2, B6, Vitamin E, and Vitamin K.

Some people are allergic to soy products, including edamame. Up to 8% of children in the United States are allergic to soy proteins. The major soy allergen has been identified by scientists at the USDA, and soybean varieties without the allergenic protein have been developed.

UNC’s Dining Services, uses edamame not only on our salad bar as a topping for salads but also in vegetable dishes, soups, entrées and side dishes. Look for them on the menu throughout the semester and at the salad bar at Tobey-Kendel Dining Room & Holmes Dining Hall!

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Words of Wisdom on Saving Money

College is a great time to learn the healthy habit of saving money. This Infograph provided by Dailyinfograph.com shows how a little bit of cutting back per month can help maximize your overall savings in a year. Here are a few tips:

  • Pace your spending habits by creating a budget (and stick with it).
  • Emergencies happen. If you have a job, set aside a little each paycheck (maybe 10-15%) for unforeseen expenses.
  • Pay with cash or with a pre-paid card. Credit card debt is not fun!
  • At the end of the month, look through your spending history. What can you cut back on?
  • Carefully consider high-priced purchases (over $100) and don’t impulse buy. Think about for a week before you purchase it.
  • Shop around and compare prices.
  • Use coupons and promo codes.

Remember, a penny saved is pennies earned so don’t worry if all you can save is pennies. Eventually, they add up!

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What’s in Carter Hall?

Part of being on your own is to locate some important areas around campus that can help answer questions like where you would pay your bill, register for classes, find out about graduation requirements and learn about your financial aid.

Those important questions can all be answered by a school representative in Carter Hall on the central part of campus.

The Financial Aid and the Bursar’s Office can be found on the first floor while the Graduate School and Center for International Education are located on the second floor. We have the Admission’s and Registrar’s Office located on the third floor and the President’s Office is on the fourth floor.

Whichever floor you are on, someone is available to offer assistance. We can all direct you to the proper department to answer your questions. Every department in Carter Hall has availability to a Spanish speaking representative of UNC, too.

The more you explore around campus, the more you know. Remember, UNC wouldn’t happen if you weren’t here, and we’re all here for you! Please let us know if you have any questions; we are happy to help.

Go #UNCBears!

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Oops We Made a Mistake!

In response to:

Just received my first “addition” of the Parent Connect newsletter. Pretty sure it should say “edition .”

Thank you for bringing this to our attention! We were so excited to get the new “Edition” out that we didn’t dot all of our i’s and cross all of our t’s. 

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What Is a Diversity Mentor? 
UNC’s Department of Housing & Residential Education is committed to the education and development of student potential, both academically and personally. We offer an inclusive learning community that emphasizes the connection, support and diversity that makes it possible for the individual to succeed in their college pursuits.  
Diversity Mentors work and collaborate with all levels of Housing & Residential Education staff. They focus their time, talents and enthusiasm on making our residence halls safe, welcoming and celebrative for all students, and they plan programs and events that deal primarily with diversity topics. 
Their mission is to:
Help build a community of respect and appreciation
Encourage openness 
Educate with passion
Share experiences
Promote inclusiveness
Create dialogue
Assure dignity and respect
Support community learning
Facilitate and provide a variety of initiatives and programs highlighting diversity awareness on campus and in the broader community
Place a priority on educating students in a way that increases awareness and sensitivity about the differences each student brings to campus
Each residence hall/community has one Diversity Mentor. To find our who your Diversity Mentor is, contact your Hall Director or RA! Be sure to check out their Facebook page. If you have any questions, please contact our office of Housing and Residential Education via email or call 970-351-2721.
What diversity programs would you like to see at UNC? 

What Is a Diversity Mentor? 

UNC’s Department of Housing & Residential Education is committed to the education and development of student potential, both academically and personally. We offer an inclusive learning community that emphasizes the connection, support and diversity that makes it possible for the individual to succeed in their college pursuits.  

Diversity Mentors work and collaborate with all levels of Housing & Residential Education staff. They focus their time, talents and enthusiasm on making our residence halls safe, welcoming and celebrative for all students, and they plan programs and events that deal primarily with diversity topics. 

Their mission is to:

  • Help build a community of respect and appreciation
  • Encourage openness 
  • Educate with passion
  • Share experiences
  • Promote inclusiveness
  • Create dialogue
  • Assure dignity and respect
  • Support community learning
  • Facilitate and provide a variety of initiatives and programs highlighting diversity awareness on campus and in the broader community
  • Place a priority on educating students in a way that increases awareness and sensitivity about the differences each student brings to campus

Each residence hall/community has one Diversity Mentor. To find our who your Diversity Mentor is, contact your Hall Director or RA! Be sure to check out their Facebook page. If you have any questions, please contact our office of Housing and Residential Education via email or call 970-351-2721.

What diversity programs would you like to see at UNC? 

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Homesickness: Be Aware and Be Prepared

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We are a month into the semester, and some of the excitement of going to college may have dissipated. Homesickness is something that many students will experience. It is important for both students and parents to be aware and prepared.

For Students:

Adapting to a new place can be difficult. Here are some tips to help you adjust and confront your homesickness.

  • Explore your new environment. Walk/drive/bike around so you become familiar with the way to class, food, recreation, entertainment and the nearest stores. The more familiar you are, the less foreign your new environment will feel.
  • Get connected by introducing yourself to at least one new person every day. Having familiar faces can help you feel less lonely in your new environment.
  • Bring memories and the comforts of home to college. Decorate your room with familiar pictures, your favorite pillows, posters, etc. to help it feel more like home.

For Parents:

Homesickness can also be a challenge for caregivers. Here’s tips to help your student navigate.

  • Be aware of your own reluctance to “let them go” and how this can influence your student’s experience. Share with your student that you miss them and you are excited for their college experience.
  • Listen to your child and validate any difficult feelings they might be having. Help them understand that being homesick is normal and ok.
  • Limit your advice giving. Empower your student to make the smaller decisions on their own. This helps them own and invest in their experience.
  • Encourage them to utilize campus resources that may help them with their transition.
  • Feel free to send them care packages with comforts from home. This can serve as a reminder that even though you may be distant, you are still there for support.

On-campus resources for students include the Counseling Center in Cassidy Hall, Psychological Services Clinic in McKee Hall and Student Activities in the University Center. Students can always talk to their Resident Assistant or Hall Director, as well. They are great resources for students and have received training on topics such as homesickness.

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Brain Matters: Computer Models as a Future Tool in Diagnosing Brain Injuries

University of Northern Colorado’s Mathematical Sciences Professor Dr. Igor Szczyrba and his team of researchers have been conducting investigations for the past ten years in how traumatic brain injuries unfold. Through mathematics and computer simulations, they are providing an effective way to represent how brain matter or brain tissue behaves during accidents.

Their research is currently being applied in collaboration with Intel Corporation and helmet manufacturer Riddell to simulate collisions on the football field. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, approximately 85 percent of sports-related concussions are typically undiagnosed, which can negatively affect players’ health and well-being, both short and long term.

Approximately 1.4 million people experience a traumatic brain injury and 50,000 people die from head injuries annually. More than 5 million Americans who have survived traumatic brain injuries need ongoing help in performing daily activities (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke).

To read more about Dr. Szczyrba’s team and their research, click here.

 

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